readathon

Read-a-thon Charities: Suggestions

In previous read-a-thons, some participants chose to donate to a charity of their choice for each book read, for the total number of pages read, or for the total number of hours spent reading. Some even got sponsors who agreed to donate for them.  This is by no means mandatory, but if you’re joining the read-a-thon and are able to donate, here’s a list of charities you could donate to:

Animals, Nature and Conservation

Children

International Relief

Health

Literacy

Poverty and Hunger

Women

Others

Please keep in mind that this is not meant to be an exhaustive list, nor a list of “official” read-a-thon charities. You’re more than welcome to donate to a charity not listed above. In fact, if you have suggestions of charities to be added to be list, please leave them in the comments, and we’ll be happy to add them.

25 thoughts on “Read-a-thon Charities: Suggestions”

  1. Thanks so much for putting this list together! I’ll be reading for Free Arts for Abused Children. Thanks for reminding me of them 🙂

  2. Nymeth,

    Thank you for adding The Kidney Cancer Association. It really means a lot. I miss him every day and I dream about him in some form or fashion every night. It’s been like that from the day he passed away. He and I had our ups and downs, but overall we were pretty close.

    Now I just have to figure out how I want to count things so I can donate to the Association. I was thinking a dollar a page, but I haven’t run the numbers to see how that would actually work.

    Any suggestions?

    My main goal for this read-a-thon is to have fun. To read for charity is just icing on the cake.

  3. blacklin: it depends on how much you can afford to donate, and for how long you think you’ll be able to read. But in previous read-a-thons most bloggers went with something like 10 cents a page, or 15, or 30. Some bloggers managed to read up to 1500-2000 pages, so that amounts to $150-$200 even at 10 cents. But it’s up to you, really…just do what you’re comfortable with. And like you said, the main thing is to have fun 🙂

    Bethany: done!

  4. A slightly more “vague” suggestion as there is no specific link – raise money for your local library. A lot of libraries are facing major budget cuts these days and as a result might have to cut hours/staff/services/events.

    I’ll be raising money for the Brooklyn Public Library as they’re facing the decision to cut hours which could mean no weekend or evenings and a lot of the neighborhoods they’re in can really use the job assistance programs they offer. I’m just doing this as a “please donate” over the weekend rather than trying to read a certain number of pages or books. I’ve already had a few people who rely on their libraries offer to donate by check now rather than waiting for the weekend.

  5. If anyone is reading my book, “Gimme Shelter,” for the read-a-thon, please please consider a donation to the National Alliance to End Homelessness — naeh.org.

    I’m giving 2% of the money I earn from my book to the Alliance, and I’m extraordinarily proud of the work they’re doing not just to end homelessness in America, but to prevent the root causes of it.

    Thank you and keep reading! Go go go!

  6. I’m not a reader, but I will be making a donation to Reach out and Read for each person that participates in my mini-challenge this year.

  7. I always like Donors Choose – teachers from high-need school districts submit project proposals, and you pick which project you’d like your money to support – and you can see exactly where that money goes, and see photos of your donation in action in the classroom. (Plus there are tons of bookish projects to pick from.)

    http://www.donorschoose.org/

  8. I am going to add a link and try to raise some contributions for The Child Upliftment Center in Nepal. This is a really small group of people that I was involved with when I lived in Nepal, and two of my friends started an orphanage for about 20 kids who have lost their parents to Moaist and inter-caste violence in rural regions of Nepal. They rent a house, shelter, feed, buy all the clothes and school supplies for these kids to go to have a chance. They are not affiliated with any major charity organizations and pay for all of the bills out of their own pockets and with local donations. I have just taken on the task of trying to help them get some international aid as well.

    http://www.cucnepal.org/index.html

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