April 2015, readathon

Hour 24 – Let’s All Cross the Finish Line Together

Welcome to Hour 24!!! This is Kate from Kate’s Book Nook. I will be your co-host for the final hour. We have made it, ya’ll. We have done this!!!! As per my traditions (I have a lot of traditions) I have included the video for We Are the Champions because, to me, if you have even read for just five minutes, you are a participant and you have done a good job! I am so proud of you. I really hope that you will all be back to join us in October.

Finally, I would like to take a moment to thank all of you, the readers, for joining in and making this the event that it is. Without you, we wouldn’t even have an event. Thank you for spending the last 24 hours, sharing with us, laughing with us, and reading with us. I feel like we are all connected around the world through this even.

I know that this event always brings my family together. We are spread out around the world (my parents and youngest sister live in Asia, one sister lives in Germany, I am half-South African and have family there, and one sister and I live in California along with an aunt and my grandfather. Every readathon, we all chat throughout the day and everyone reads a little bit. We send pictures of us reading and our snacks and other things. My sister in Germany had a baby in December and she sent a picture of reading a book to him (Goodnight Moon). It was the most wonderful thing I have seen all day. Our next generation is even involved in this event. Please take a moment and share with me if you have gotten anyone else involved in reading for this event.

Random Facts of the Hour

Anyone who has ever made these late night hours knows that I love to include random facts of the hour. So here are a couple random facts for this hour:

  • Nathanael West’s 1939 novel The Day of the Locust features a character named Homer Simpson.
  • William Shakespeare is the first person to record the words: amazement, bedroom, advertising, blanket, bump, gloomy, puking, gossip, drugged, champion, accused, addiction.
  • Barbara Cartland finished a novel every two weeks. (How do you even write that fast???)
  • Gabriel García Márquez won’t allow One Hundred Years of Solitude to become a film.
  • The first handwritten Bible (since the invention of the printing press) cost $8 million and took 12 years to complete. (I am going to need to disappear for the next 12 years so I can retire comfortably… Off to acquire my writing instruments. hahaha)

 End of Event Meme:

  1. Which hour was most daunting for you?
  2. Could you list a few high-interest books that you think could keep a Reader engaged for next year?
  3. Do you have any suggestions for how to improve the Read-a-thon next year?
  4. What do you think worked really well in this year’s Read-a-thon?
  5. How many books did you read?
  6. What were the names of the books you read?
  7. Which book did you enjoy most?
  8. Which did you enjoy least?
  9. If you were a Cheerleader, do you have any advice for next year’s Cheerleaders?
  10. How likely are you to participate in the Read-a-thon again? What role would you be likely to take next time?


Mini-Challenges

End of Event Meme!

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15 thoughts on “Hour 24 – Let’s All Cross the Finish Line Together”

  1. If you check out my Instagram (tashajk72) you will see that my kids and husband all joined me for various parts of the readathon. Since my son just turned six and loves to read, I think I will get him involved in a more deliberate manner in October.

  2. That is so awesome! Start them young so that as they grow older, they will already have an appreciation for books and reading. And it is always better when you can make things a family affair.

  3. Which hour was most daunting for you? Hour 20
    2) The Memory of Earth by Orson Scott Card and Cat Royal by Julia Golding
    3) Nope
    4)Everyone supporting each other
    5) I didn’t read much because of my reading slump
    6)I started The Memory of Earth by Orson Scott Card
    7)….
    8)….
    9)….
    10) I will participate next time (hopefully) and I will be a reader xx

  4. 1. Which hour was most daunting for you?
    The 18th
    2. Could you list a few high-interest books that you think could keep a Reader engaged for next year?
    Sandman Volume 1 and Lumber Janes
    3.. Do you have any suggestions for how to improve the Read-a-thon next year?
    No, I think it’s perfect the way it is.
    4. What do you think worked really well in this year’s Read-a-thon?
    The hourly updates.
    5. How many books did you read?
    4 and a half
    6. What were the names of the books you read?
    The New and Improved Romie Futch
    Sandman Volume 1
    The Gray Zone
    Trigger Warning
    The Pretender Cemetery Girl #1
    7, Which book did you enjoy most?
    The New and Improved Romie Futch
    8. Which did you enjoy least?
    The Pretender Cemetery Girl #1
    9. If you were a Cheerleader, do you have any advice for next year’s Cheerleaders?
    No…not my kind of thing.
    10. How likely are you to participate in the Read-a-thon again?
    I will definitely participate.
    11. What role would you be likely to take next time?
    Reader

  5. Which hour was most daunting for you?
    I guess all of them. I just got sick with cold on Thursday/Friday, so I unfortunately didn’t do all 24 hours and decided to rather play it safe and got some sleep.

    Could you list a few high-interest books that you think could keep a Reader engaged for next year?
    I believe short stories are great for such events. On the last Read-a-thon I made the mistake of tackling a 1000 pager, and it’s easy to get distracted. Short stories hold you till the end of one and then you’re eager to start the next one.
    I’d recommend What We Talk About When We Talk About Love by Raymond Carver. Another that kept me glued to itself was Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino, not short stories per se, but they are like vignettes with a common theme that connect to a larger stories.

    Do you have any suggestions for how to improve the Read-a-thon next year?
    Not really. You are doing great.

    What do you think worked really well in this year’s Read-a-thon?
    Everything. Great cheerleaders, great mini-challenges, great hourly posts.
    How many books did you read?
    5 and 1/4.
    What were the names of the books you read?
    Spati na krilu by Primož ?u?nik; What We Talk About When We Talk About Love by Raymond Carver; Everyman by Philip Roth; Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino; Apology by Plato. I also started Letters to a Young Mathematician, but haven’t finished that one.

    Which book did you enjoy most?
    Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino.

    Which did you enjoy least?
    Everyman by Philip Roth.

    How likely are you to participate in the Read-a-thon again?
    Very likely. This wasn’t the first and hopefully won’t be the last one.

    What role would you be likely to take next time?
    Reader again I guess.

  6. My two and a half year old had his own little stack and it was adorable. I think it’s wonderful to involve kids as soon as possible! I hope he will become a reader like me but for now I am just encouraging him and reading to him as much as possible. Hopefully it sticks 😀

  7. Yess I was wondering the same thing! Any date for October? My schedule’s filling up but I really want to factor this one in! 😀

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